My roots 

My roots 

#science

#science

Criticism and testing are the essence of our work. This means that science is a fundamentally social activity, which implies that it depends on good communication. In practice of science we are aware of this, and that is why it is right for our journals to insist on clarity and intelligibility…

Herman bondi, quotes in How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper

THe Human Genome Project Video

(Source: jules-fern)

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Alcohol-induced dilated cardiomyopathy
Note the enlarged ventricular chambers - the increased size causes the appearance of thinned ventricular walls. Assumption that there is decreased musculature in heart walls can cause incorrect diagnosis of cause-of-death.
Dilated cardiomyopathy can cause systolic dysfunction and atrial fibrilation, as well as being a source of thromboembolism.

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Alcohol-induced dilated cardiomyopathy

Note the enlarged ventricular chambers - the increased size causes the appearance of thinned ventricular walls. Assumption that there is decreased musculature in heart walls can cause incorrect diagnosis of cause-of-death.

Dilated cardiomyopathy can cause systolic dysfunction and atrial fibrilation, as well as being a source of thromboembolism.

(via what-a-ride)

Men love to wonder, and that is the seed of science.

pretty amazing

cwnl:

Gorgeous Concept Art of Newly-Discovered “Earth 2.0” Planet

Image Credit: Science Artist Ron Miller

I can never get enough of space conceptual art, see, sometimes in science, there comes a time when they do not have the technology or data to envision what something might be or look like. This is where art and a little bit of imagination comes in, you have artists that share as much love for all things science but do not refrain from envisioning these worlds, stars, occurrences because that’s typically how imagination works, no constraints.

On the plus side to this, you have a public who is eager to put a temporary image to the data trickling in and that’s where conceptual artists come in, they ignite that wonder in us to think of all the possibilities.

After the link are a couple more images courtesy of io9 illustrating concepts of what these worlds could be. When data comes in that says it isn’t or is as envisioned then we move on to the next discovery and continue on a never-ending process of discoveries and revelations.

What would it look like on the surface of Kepler-22b, the planet that NASA today called “the most Earthlike planet yet discovered”? Science artist Ron Miller offers these visions of a planet that could be home to future human colonies.

Bathed in water, with streams of clouds covering the view of its many sister planets, Kepler-22b might be as beautiful as our home world. It’s twice the size of Earth, and inhabits its star system’s “goldilocks zone” where liquid water can exist and it’s not too hot or cold for life as we know it. You can learn more about Kepler-22b here.

(via afro-dominicano)

ohscience:

72 hour chick embryo, dissected from the yolk (40x) 

ohscience:

72 hour chick embryo, dissected from the yolk (40x) 

Scientists are explorers. Philosophers are tourists.

    Richard Feynman, American physicist (1918-1988),  in 1985, cited in G. Laurence Nickard, Phenomenal surfaces and noumenal depths: Philosophy and quantum theory, ProQuest, 2006, p. 5. (via amiquote)

(Source: sciencenote)

Two brain halves, one perception

sciencenote:

Our brain is divided into two hemispheres, which are linked through only a few connections. However, we do not seem to have a problem to create a coherent image of our environment – our perception is not “split” in two halves. For the seamless unity of our subjective experience, information from both hemispheres needs to be efficiently integrated. The corpus callosum, the largest fibre bundle connecting the left and right side of our brain, plays a major role in this process. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt investigated whether differences between individuals in the anatomy of the corpus callosum would predict how observers perceive a visual stimulus for which the left and right hemisphere need to cooperate. As their results indicate, the characteristics of specific callosal fibre tracts are related to the subjective experience of individuals.

Ode to the Brain! by Symphony of Science

I think its awesome!